OUR MISSION

Cleveland Builds was created to connect motivated Clevelanders with career opportunities in construction where hard work and determination are rewarded. An aging workforce, diversification of the regional economy, and the educational system’s singular focus on college paths has created a growing skills shortage. Together, these factors threaten Greater Cleveland’s economic growth and prosperity by hindering employers who need motivated, skilled tradespersons as well as career seekers who often don’t realize or understand how to pursue the meaningful career opportunities that are right here in Greater Cleveland.

In response to this threat, Cleveland Builds provides a successful model of pre-employment education and training for job seekers to qualify for family-sustaining jobs in the construction trades. Modeled after Wisconsin’s BIG STEP Program, Cleveland Builds’ programs and services are tailored to address specific areas of need in the regional economy, including training and recruitment efforts that specifically benefit both our participants and the Cleveland workforce at large.

  • Program participants are more likely to find work and worked more months.

  • Program participants earn significantly more. While some of these gains can be attributed to working more hours, participants also earn significantly higher hourly wages.

  • Program participants are significantly more likely to get jobs that offer benefits.

OUR SERVICES & PROGRAMS

  • Connect qualified individuals to training programs, apprenticeships, and careers that allow candidates to “earn while they learn”
  • Assessment of individual needs and strengths
  • Development of a plan of action to help participants secure employment
  • Providing test tutoring and other preparatory services (day and evening classes)
  • Placing participants in on-the-job training programs leading to construction-related apprenticeships
  • Arranging necessary classroom and hands-on training to prepare and place participants into higher-paying employment opportunities

Our Requirements

  • 18 years old
  • High school diploma/GED/HSED
  • Valid driver’s license
  • Must have reliable transportation

OUR PARTNERSHIPS

Cleveland Builds’ efficacy and influence depend upon meaningful collaboration with our partners:

  • Cleveland Building & Construction Trades Council: The Cleveland Building & Construction Trades Council is the umbrella organization for local unions working in the construction industry in the Greater Cleveland region.
  • Construction Employers Association: The Construction Employers Association of Cleveland represents the leading general contractors, construction managers and specialty contractors in Northeast Ohio.
  • National Electrical Contractors Association: The Greater Cleveland Chapter of NECA represents the best electrical contractors from the Cleveland area.
  • Mechanical & Plumbing Industry Council: The Mechanical and Plumbing Industry Council (MAPIC) is composed of the Mechanical Contractors’ Association of Cleveland (MCA); the Cleveland Plumbing Contractors’ Association, Inc. (CPCA); the Certified Pipe Welding Bureau of Cleveland, Inc. (CPWB); and the Mechanical Service Contractors Association (MSCA). These trade associations represent companies engaged in the plumbing and pipe fitting industry.
  • Northern Ohio Painting and Taping Contractors Association: The Northern Ohio Painting and Taping Contractors Association, (NOPTCA), is a trade association serving painting and decorating contractors to help improve their businesses through educational programs, local networking, and establishing industry standards.

OUR BOARD

Supported by public, private, and philanthropic investments, Cleveland Builds’ mission focuses on providing opportunity, training, and outreach to Clevelanders. Our team members are dedicated to developing the skills our workforce needs to participate meaningfully in the economy while ensuring that union contractors have the skilled workers they need to prosper and grow in a competitive global economy.

  • Dan Gallagher: IBEW, Local 38; Cleveland Building and Construction Trades Council
  • Shawn Gray: Plumbers, Local 55; Cleveland Building and Construction Trades Council
  • Terry Joyce: Laborers, Local 310; Cleveland Building and Construction Trades Council
  • Armando Francisco: Lake Erie Electric; Construction Employers Association
  • Tom Martin, Jr.: T.H. Martin, Inc.; Construction Employers Association
  • Tari Rivera; Regency Construction; Construction Employers Association
  • Tim Linville; Construction Employers Association
  • Dave Wondolowski; Cleveland Building and Construction Trades Council
  • Melissa Burrows, Ph. D.: City of Cleveland, Office of Equal Opportunity
  • Norm Edwards; American Center for Economic Equality
  • Kenny Torres; Gilbane Building Company

LOCAL UNIONS

    Boilermakers make and install boilers and other large containers that house gases or liquids such as oil. Job duties include reading blueprints, casting pieces and bending them into shape, and welding or bolting pieces together. Boilermakers also test completed boilers and perform routine maintenance. They often upgrade boilers to meet environmental standards and increase their efficiency. Boilermakers can work for refineries or construction or natural resource companies, or they can find careers as metal fabricators or power or water plant operators.

    Training

    Most prospective boilermakers earn a high school diploma or GED and then enroll in an apprenticeship training program, such as the Boilermakers National Joint Apprenticeship Program (www.bnap.com). This program takes approximately four years to complete and requires 6,000 hours of work assignments and 576 hours in the classroom, studying such disciplines as welding, drafting, rigging, and boiler technology. Alternately, some boilermakers take courses at a technical school before learning additional skills directly from their employers.

    Required Skills

    Being a boilermaker is physically demanding, and workers must have the necessary strength, coordination, and manual dexterity to complete the job. They also must possess various technical skills, such as the ability to weld, work with a variety of tools, and use rigging. Boilermakers must be prepared to travel to project sites and spend long spans of time away from home.

    Wage Averages for Ohio (Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2013)

    Hourly: $30.76
    Annual: $60,130

    BOILERMAKERS744.ORG | 216-241-2085

      Bricklayers construct walls, partitions, fireplaces, chimneys, and other structures from brick, block, and other masonry materials such as structural tile, concrete cinder, glass, gypsum, and terra cotta. They spread a layer or “bed” of soft mortar that serves as base and binder using a trowel. The brick or block is then positioned, and the excess mortar removed. Bricklayers must understand and work from blueprints and be able to use measuring, leveling, and aligning tools to check their work.

      Working Conditions

      Much of masonry work is out-of-doors and depends on suitable weather. However, modern construction methods—along with heaters and temporary enclosures—stretch the season and make bricklayers less dependent on good weather. Bricklayers are on their feet all day and do considerable lifting of heavy materials with much bending, sometimes from scaffolding high above the ground.

      Aptitude and Interest

      Masonry construction involves a variety of duties requiring close tolerances and standards. Bricklaying requires careful, accurate work by the craftsman. Masons should enjoy working outside under many different weather conditions. Good eyesight is important to quickly determine lines and levels. Manual dexterity is especially important.

      Training

      To become a skilled bricklayer, training is essential. It can be acquired informally through “learning-by-working,” company on-the-job training programs, trade or vocational/technical schools, unilaterally (management or labor) sponsored trainee programs, registered labor-management apprenticeship programs, or a combination of the above. It is generally accepted that the more formalized training programs give more comprehensive skill training. Recommended high school courses include algebra, geometry, general science, mechanical drawing, and English.

      Wage Averages for Ohio (Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2013)

      Hourly: $21.87
      Annual: $46.460

      BRICKLAYERSLOCAL5OHIO.COM | 440-986-3300

        Carpenters possess skills and perform work which is basic to most building construction. They erect wood framework in buildings; build forms for concrete; and erect partitions, studs, joints, drywalls, and rafters. Many carpenters work indoors to install all types of floor coverings, ceilings, paneling, trim, and interior systems. They must be very skillful as “finish” work is visible and often involves expensive materials. Some carpenters construct docks and work with large timbers and drive piles to support the foundations of buildings and bridges. Another branch of the trade, called millwrights, installs heavy machinery in industrial plants and turbine generators in power plants. All carpenters use a wide variety of hand and power tools, and they must be able to maintain their tools in good, safe working order.

        Working Conditions

        Carpenters usually work with or around other construction tradesmen. They work indoors and outdoors and often in tight places. All carpenters have to do considerable climbing, lifting, and carrying to perform their work. They must also be able to do a great deal of reaching, balancing, kneeling, crawling, and turning.

        Aptitude and Interest

        To be a good carpenter, a person should enjoy doing precision work, have pride of craftsmanship, the ability to work without close supervision, and be able to adapt to a wide variety of conditions. Manual dexterity and the ability to solve math problems quickly and accurately is necessary for those who wish to become top craftsmen.

        Training

        To become a skilled carpenter, training is essential. It can be acquired informally through “learning-by-working,” company on-the-job training programs, trade or vocational/technical schools, unilaterally (management or labor) sponsored trainee programs, registered labor-management apprenticeship programs, or a combination of the above. It is generally accepted that the more formalized training programs give more comprehensive skills training. Recommended high school courses include algebra, general science, mechanical drawing, English, blueprint reading, and general shop.

        Wage Averages for Ohio (Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2013)

        Hourly: $20.39
        Annual: $43,800

        OHCAP.ORG | 330-659-9495

          Cement masons level, smooth, and shape surfaces of freshly poured concrete on projects ranging from patios and basements to dams, highways, and building foundations and walls. Cement masons must have a thorough knowledge of concrete characteristics and related materials. They must also be familiar with the effects of heat, cold, and wind on the curing of concrete. They must be able to tell by sight and touch what is happening to concrete in order to prevent defects.

          Working Conditions

          Since much of the concrete finishing is done outdoors, working conditions are governed by the weather. Concrete is not usually placed in rain or when temperatures are below freezing. However, the work, either indoors or outdoors, may be in areas that are muddy, dusty, and dirty. The work requires continuous physical effort.

          Aptitude and Interest

          Finishers should enjoy doing demanding work. They should have pride of craftsmanship and be able to work without close supervision. To become a skilled cement mason, training is essential. It can be acquired informally through “learning-by-working,” company on-the-job training programs, trade or vocational/technical schools, unilaterally (management or labor) sponsored trainee programs, registered labor-management apprenticeship programs, or a combination of the above. It is generally accepted that the more formalized training programs give more comprehensive skill training. Recommended high school courses include English, math, mechanical drawing, and general science.

          Wage Averages for Ohio (Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2013)

          Hourly: $19.43
          Annual: $41,990

          CEMENTMASONS404.COM | 216-771-3929

            Drywall finishers seal joints between plasterboard or other wallboards, mix sealing compound, press paper tape over joints to embed tape into compound and seal joints, or tape joints using mechanical applicators that spread compound and embed tape in one operation. They sand rough spots after compound dries, fill cracks and holes in walls, and may apply texturing compound and primer to walls and ceilings in preparation for final finishing by using brushes, rollers, or spray guns. They may countersink nails or screws below the surface of walls prior to applying sealing compound, using a hammer or a screwdriver.

            Working Conditions

            The work is done on residential, industrial, and commercial properties, both new and existing construction, inside as well as outside.

            Length of Apprenticeship

            The apprenticeship lasts three years. Apprentices must complete a minimum of 144 hours per year of related classroom training and a total of 6,000 hours on-the-job training.

            Minimum Qualifications

            Apprenticeship applicants must be at least 17 years of age. In addition, they must provide proof of high school graduation or general education development (GED) equivalent. Local apprenticeship committees may require additional qualifications.

            Wage Averages for Ohio (Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2013)

            Hourly: $23.87
            Annual: $50,480

            IUPAT-DC6.ORG | 440-239-4575

              Electricians lay out, install, and test electrical service and electrical wire systems used to provide heat, light, power, air conditioning, and refrigeration in homes, office building, factories, hospitals, and schools. They also install conduit and other materials and connect electrical machinery, equipment, and controls and transmission systems.

              Working Conditions

              Electricians work both in and outside. They work in all kinds of weather while installing grounding and temporary lights and power. The work is active and strenuous, with much of it done in awkward positions and frequently in cramped quarters. They must do considerable standing, reaching, bending, stooping, climbing, carrying, and lifting in order to install electrical conduit and equipment.

              Aptitude and Interest

              Applicants interested in becoming electricians must enjoy working with math problems and be able to work with fine measurements. They must be able to work very carefully, without close supervision, have steady nerves, and possess a great deal of patience. Prospective electricians should have above average intelligence, the ability to visualize detailed sketches, finger dexterity, understanding of electrical theory, and be able to plan sequences of operations. Good color vision is also important.

              Training

              To become a skilled electrician training is essential. It can be acquired informally through “learning-by-working,” company on-the-job training programs, trade or vocational/ technical schools, unilaterally (management or labor) sponsored trainee programs, registered labor-management apprenticeship programs, or a combination of the above. It is generally accepted that the more formalized training programs give more comprehensive skill training. Recommended high school courses include English, algebra, geometry, trigonometry, physics, mechanical drawing, blueprint reading, and general shop.

              Wage Averages for Ohio (Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2013)

              Hourly: $23.87
              Annual: $50,480

              CEJATC.ORG | 216-573-0400

                Carpet installers lay floor coverings in both residential and commercial sites. This can involve removing old flooring, preparing and measuring the floor area, and installing padding beneath carpeting. Installers then position the carpet and use staples or glue to secure the carpet to a snug fit.

                Training

                There are typically no educational requirements for this occupation. Those with a high school diploma or equivalent have a competitive advantage in the labor market. In addition, moderate-term on-the-job training is typically needed, once employed, to attain competency in the skills needed in this occupation.

                Wage Averages for Ohio (Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2013)

                Hourly: $19.83
                Annual: $42,330

                OHCAP.ORG | 330-659-9495

                  In the construction industry, glaziers are responsible for the sizing, cutting, fitting, and setting of all glass products into openings of all kinds. Basically, glaziers perform two types of glass settings. The first and most common is the installation of glass in windows and doors. The second type of glass work is the installation of structural glass. This type of glass is used as decoration for ceilings, walls, building fronts, and partitions.

                  Working Conditions

                  Glaziers sometimes work alone on small jobs, but usually they work in crews on larger jobs where it takes several glaziers to carry, position, and set the huge pieces of glass. There is much lifting, carrying, and climbing.

                  Aptitude and Interest

                  Glaziers should be patient and careful workers. Good manual dexterity and the ability to align things by eye are also important assets.

                  Training

                  To become a skilled glazier, training is essential. It can be acquired informally through “learning-by-working,” company on-the-job training programs, trade or vocational/technical schools, unilaterally (management or labor) sponsored trainee programs, registered labor-management apprenticeship programs, or a combination of the above. It is generally accepted that the more formalized training programs give more comprehensive skill training. Recommended high school courses include general mathematics, blueprint reading, and general shop.

                  Wage Averages for Ohio (Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2013)

                  Hourly: $19.66
                  Annual: $40,900

                  IUPAT-DC6.ORG | 440-239-4575

                    Workers apply insulation materials to pipes, tanks, boilers, ducts, refrigeration equipment, and other surfaces requiring thermal temperature control. Workers handle insulation materials made of fiberglass, rubber, calcium silicate, and urethane. Asbestos workers remove asbestos-containing materials.

                    Working Conditions

                    Work is conducted in commercial buildings, refineries, ships, industrial plants, and private residences in all kinds of indoor and outdoor climates, usually in and around dust. Workers must wear respirators. They use a variety of power tools and provide their own hand tools. This trade has a high health hazard risk. Workers must be able to lift, bend, and carry.

                    Length of Apprenticeship

                    The apprenticeship is a four-year program with the opportunity to advance about every six months. Apprentices must complete a minimum of 88 related classroom hours per year and 8,000 on-the-job training hours.

                    Minimum Qualifications

                    Apprenticeship applicants must be at least 18 years of age. In addition, they must provide proof of high school graduation or general education development (GED) equivalent. Local apprenticeship committees may require additional qualifications.

                    Wage Averages for Ohio (Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2013)

                    Hourly: $25.31
                    Annual: $53,880

                    INSULATORS3.ORG | 216-621-3522

                      Structural iron workers erect the steel framework for large industrial, commercial, or residential buildings, bridges, and metal tanks. They erect, bolt, rivet, or weld the fabricated structural metal members that support the structure during and after construction. Some iron workers, called rodmen, set steel bars (rebar) or steel mesh in forms to strengthen concrete buildings, bridges, and highways. Other iron workers, called ornamental iron workers, install and assemble grills, canopies, stairways, iron ladders, decorative iron railings, posts, and gates.

                      Working Conditions

                      Iron workers work in crews, usually outdoors. Work is highly seasonal and dependent upon suitable weather conditions. They frequently work in high places and cramped quarters. There is considerable climbing, walking, sitting, and balancing on ladders and girders.

                      Aptitude and Interest

                      Iron workers must receive satisfaction from working with their hands. They must be able to work to rigid standards and fine measurements. They must have an acute awareness of dangers to both themselves and their co-workers. Also, ironworkers can not be afraid of work in high places.

                      Training

                      To become a skilled iron worker, training is essential. It can be acquired informally through “learning-by-working,” company on-the-job training programs, trade or vocational/technician schools, unilaterally (management or labor) sponsored trainee programs, registered labor-management apprenticeship programs, or a combination of the above. It is generally accepted that the more formalized training programs give more comprehensive skill training. Recommended high school courses include English, general math, algebra, geometry, physics, mechanical drawing, and welding.

                      Wage Averages for Ohio (Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2013)

                      Hourly: $26.59
                      Annual: $54,670

                      IW17.ORG | 216-771-5558

                        Laborers are diversely skilled workers who build and repair roads, highways, bridges, sewers, and tunnels; construct buildings; clean up hazardous waste sites; and much more. From small, one-day jobs to massive, multi-year construction projects, laborers are involved in nearly every construction project. They are typically employed on-site from the day a project begins until the day it is completed. s laborers do are drilling and blasting, erecting scaffolds, pipe laying, grade checking, cutting steel, operating power equipment, traffic control, and a variety of other jobs. Laborers may work jointly with other crafts or independently on projects.

                        Working Conditions

                        Due to the variety of the jobs they perform, laborers work in all types of conditions both indoors and outdoors. Certain jobs may require laborers to work underground, in confined spaces, at considerable heights, or even on Ohio’s highways. Laboring is a physical trade at times that may require climbing, lifting, kneeling, and balancing. Because laborers work in many varied conditions, they must be knowledgeable of the hazards and safety requirements of the job.

                        Aptitude and Interest

                        Laborers should enjoy working outside performing work which is physical in nature, but also requires specialized skills. Laborers should master basic reading and math skills to read and interpret construction plans and to operate today’s increasingly high-tech input devices like GPS, robotic pipe cutters, etc.

                        Training

                        To become a skilled productive laborer, training is important. It can be acquired informally through “learning-by-working,” company on-the-job training programs, trade or vocational/technician schools, unilaterally (management or labor) sponsored trainee programs, registered labor-management apprenticeship programs, or a combination of the above. It is generally accepted that the more formalized training programs give more comprehensive skill training. Recommended high school courses include English and basic math.

                        Wage Averages for Ohio (Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2013)

                        Hourly: $17.56
                        Annual: $39,370

                        LOCAL310.COM | 216-881-5901

                          You might consider becoming a Millwright if you like to work with machines, tools, and precision instruments. Millwrights work with metal materials, machinery, and equipment that requires precision. They are experts in welding, rigging, precision alignment and layout, fabrication, and industrial maintenance.

                          IUPAT-DC6.ORG | 440-239-4575

                            Operators operate and maintain a variety of powerful equipment ranging from bulldozers, backhoes, and earthmovers to very large power shovels and cranes. They also lubricate, maintain, and perform minor repair and adjustment to the machinery.

                            Working Conditions

                            Because almost all the work is out-of-doors, working conditions are governed by the weather. The work is physically demanding and operators are subject to jarring, jolting, and continuous noise. Working with the equipment offers danger of injury and requires constant attention.

                            Aptitude and Interest

                            Operators have good eyesight and better-than-average coordination in order to operate both hand and foot levers simultaneously. They must have good judgment in order to perform complicated tasks, and must be able to work closely with other crafts without constant supervision. Skilled operators are constantly alert and observant of their surroundings.

                            Training

                            To become a skilled equipment operator training is essential. It can be acquired informally through “learning-by-working,” company on-the-job training programs, trade or vocational/technical schools, unilaterally (management or labor) sponsored trainee programs, registered labor-management apprenticeship programs, or a combination of the above. It is generally accepted that the more formalized training programs give more comprehensive skill training. Recommended high school courses include English, algebra, geometry, general sciences, and mechanical drawing.

                            Wage Averages for Ohio (Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2013)

                            Hourly: $21.40
                            Annual: $49,320

                            IAMLOCAL18.ORG | 216-432-3138

                              The methods of painting preparation and application are different, but both jobs are concerned with covering walls and surfaces. These are two separate skills, but many craftsmen learn to do both. Painting includes the preparation of surfaces and the application of paint, varnish, enamel, lacquer, and similar materials to wood, metal, or masonry buildings. Painters may apply the paint with a brush, a spray gun, or a roller. They also mix pigments, oils, and other materials to obtain the required color and consistency. Paperhangers must also prepare surfaces. They must have the skills to measure the surface; cut the wallpaper to size, paste, position and match designs; and work the air bubbles out to leave a smooth surface. A wide variety of specialized tools help throughout the process. They also learn to work with many fabrics, vinyl, and other materials.

                              Working Conditions

                              Painters work on floors, walls, ceilings, and equipment in interiors, and outside on everything from foundations to watertowers and flag-poles. Odors from paints, thinners, or shellac are usually present. Painters may work alone or in crews. Painters and paperhangers stand, stoop, turn, crouch, crawl, kneel, and frequently climb scaffolds and ladders. Safety in this occupation depends on caution and safe practices while working.

                              Aptitude and Interest

                              Applicants should be able to work with numbers and work well with their hands. To qualify for some jobs, the ability to distinguish between colors might be necessary.

                              Training

                              To become a skilled painter or paperhanger, training is essential. It can be acquired informally through “learning-by-working,” company on-the-job training programs, trade or vocational/technical schools, unilaterally (management or labor) sponsored trainee programs, registered labor-management apprenticeship programs, or a combination of the above. It is generally accepted that the more formalized training programs give more comprehensive skill training. Recommended high school courses include art, chemistry, general shop, interior decorating, math, and woodwork finishing.

                              Wage Averages for Ohio (Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2013)

                              Hourly: $16.21
                              Annual: $34,760

                              IUPAT-DC6.ORG | 440-239-4575

                                Pile drivers maneuver construction machinery to drive metal, concrete, or wood piling into the earth during the early stages of construction. If you like working with heavy equipment, welding, and rigging, you may love being a pile driver. Some even train to become underwater divers and welders!

                                OHCAP.ORG | 330-359-9495

                                  Pipefitters work from blueprints to determine the types and placement location of piping, valves, and fixtures to be installed. Pipefitters assemble, install, and maintain pipes to carry liquids, steam, compressed air, gases, and fluids needed for processing, manufacturing, heating, and cooling. They must be able to change and repair pipe systems and do all types of pipe welding. They measure, cut, bend, and thread pipes, joining sections together as necessary using elbows, t-joints, or other couplings. Pipefitters install and repair high-pressure pipe systems, especially in industrial and commercial establishments. After a pipe system is installed, pipefitters check for leaks by forcing liquid steam or air through it under pressure. Tools used include wrenches, reamers, drills, hammers, chisels, saws, gas torches, gas or electric welding equipment, pipe cutters, benders, and threaders.

                                  Working Conditions

                                  Pipework is active and sometimes strenuous. The work is subject to hot and cold temperatures and fumes. Occasionally, pipefitters must operate in cramped or uncomfortable positions or stand for prolonged periods on ladders or scaffolds. The work may be indoors or outdoors in unfinished sections of new buildings.

                                  Aptitude and Interest

                                  Applicants should be able to understand detailed written and verbal instructions. They must enjoy working with their hands and working outdoors. They must be able to solve arithmetic problems quickly and accurately.

                                  Training

                                  To become a skilled pipefitter, training is essential. It can be acquired informally through “learning-by-working,” company on-the-job training programs, trade or vocational/ technical schools, unilaterally (management or labor) sponsored trainee programs, registered labor-management apprenticeship programs, or a combination of the above. It is generally accepted that the more formalized training programs give more comprehensive skill training. Recommended high school courses include English, general math, algebra, geometry, trigonometry, general science, physics, and mechanical drawing.

                                  Wage Averages for Ohio (Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2013)

                                  Hourly: $23.55
                                  Annual: $50,980

                                  PIPEFITTERS120.ORG | 216-524-8334

                                    Plumbers are skilled craftsmen who install, repair, and alter pipe systems that carry gases, water, and other liquids required for sanitation, storm water, industrial production, and other uses. They install plumbing fixtures, appliances, bathtubs, basins, sinks, showers, and grease line systems. They work from blueprints and working drawings to determine materials required for installation. They cut and thread pipe using pipe cutters, cutting torches, and pipe threading machines.

                                    Working Conditions

                                    Plumbers may have to work indoors or outdoors on a ladder or scaffold, underground in a trench, a crawl space under a building, or in the unfinished basement of a new building. Some of the work is dirty and messy in dusty or muddy conditions. The work is active and strenuous, involving standing, bending, crawling, lifting, pulling, and pushing, and is often done in strict accordance with the state plumbing and mechanical code regulations.

                                    Aptitude and Interest

                                    A plumber works to solve a variety of problems. As in most service occupations, plumbers need to get along well with all kinds of people, and they can get called out during evenings, weekends, or holidays to perform their job.

                                    Training

                                    To become a skilled plumber, training is essential. It can be acquired informally through “learning-by-working,” company on-the-job training programs, trade or vocational/ technical schools, unilaterally (management or labor) sponsored trainee programs, registered labor-management apprenticeship programs, or a combination of the above. It is generally accepted that the more formalized training programs give more comprehensive skill training. Recommended high school courses include English, math, drafting, blueprint reading, physics, and chemistry.

                                    Wage Averages for Ohio (Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2013)

                                    Hourly: $23.55
                                    Annual: $50,980

                                    PLUMBERS55.COM | 216-447-3408

                                      Roofers apply built-up composition roofing and many other materials such as tile, slate, composition shingles, metals, various types of plastic materials, and other surfaces. Roofers also remove old materials in preparation for new roofing material. Some of the equipment they use are tar kettles, power-operated hoists and lifts, compressors, shingle removing equipment, and spray rigs.

                                      Working Conditions

                                      Roofers work as part of a crew, usually in the open, so they are dependent on good weather conditions. The majority of the work is done at some height, (on roofs or scaffolds), so much of the time is spent climbing ladders. Work is strenuous and involves standing, climbing, bending, and squatting, often in a very hot environment.

                                      Aptitude and Interest

                                      Roofers must be physically strong, with flexible muscles and joints. Roofers often work high above the ground and anyone with a fear of heights should look for another field. Roofers often work in very hot or very cold weather.

                                      Training

                                      To become a skilled roofer, training is essential. It can be acquired informally through”learning-by-working,” company on-the-job training programs, trade or vocational/technical schools, unilaterally (management or labor) sponsored trainee programs, registered labor-management apprenticeship programs, or a combination of the above. It is generally accepted that the more formalized training programs give more comprehensive skill training. Recommended high school courses include mathematics, blueprint reading, and general shop.

                                      Wage Averages for Ohio (Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2013)

                                      Hourly: $16.91
                                      Annual: $37,200

                                      ROOFERSLOCAL44.ORG | 216-781-4844

                                        The sheet metal worker works from sketches, blueprints, or verbal instructions necessary to make products, then installs a wide variety of articles made from sheets of steel, aluminum, copper, and other materials. They apply shop mathematics to lay out the work to be performed. A sheet metal worker uses manual or power-operated tools such as shears, breaks (for bending), punch and forming presses, and rolling and crimping machines to cut, bend, and shape the metal. They build the heating, air conditioning, ventilation, and exhaust system ducts in commercial buildings and homes. These workers make a wide variety of metal fittings and equipment for the construction industry.

                                        Working Conditions

                                        Sheet metal workers do a great deal more shop work than other construction trades. They usually spend most of the day at one work site when a project is in progress, moving to another site when it is completed. Sheet metal workers must always be careful because of the tools and sharp edges of the metal with which they work.

                                        Aptitude and Interest

                                        Those interested in becoming sheet metal workers should enjoy working with their hands. They must be able to follow instructions and work closely from shop drawings and blueprints.

                                        Training

                                        To become a skilled sheet metal worker, training is essential. It can be acquired informally through “learning-by-working,” company on-the-job training programs, trade or vocational/technical schools, unilaterally (management or labor) sponsored trainee programs, registered labor-management apprenticeship programs, or a combination of the above. It is generally accepted that the more formalized training programs give more comprehensive skill training. Recommended high school courses include English, general math, geometry, trigonometry, mechanical drawing, physics, and general science. Computer literacy is becoming more important as both layout and Computer Numeric Controlled Machinery (CNC) operation is facilitated by computers.

                                        Wage Averages for Ohio (Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2013)

                                        Hourly: $22.40
                                        Annual: $46,590

                                        SHEETMETALTRAINING.ORG | 216-267-0151

                                        Union Construction Readiness Program

                                        Our mission is to enhance quality construction contractors’ ability to recruit and develop a more diverse, qualified workforce in construction and other emerging sectors of the regional economy. We do so through educating and training motivated Clevelanders to pursue careers in the trades.

                                        Industry Led & Worker Centered

                                        Stop! Take a Moment to Invest in Cleveland Builds!